Words’ Functionality


The Unicist Ontology of the Functionality of Words

Interpersonal written or spoken language requires the use of words which, according to their meaning, define the functionality of communication.

This description explains the functionality implicit in the use of words. The results of this research help individuals to diagnose reality based on the facts implicit in what is said.

Conceptually, based on their meaning, there are four different “types” of words:

1) Empty words: are those words that have no rational meaning in the context they are being used. They have multiple non structured meanings with no shareable purpose. Adjectives with no adverbial function are empty words.

2) Hollow words: are those words that are able to integrate in a unique sense the meanings given to them by emitters and receivers. In these words there is an implicit tacit purpose underlying.

3) Full words: are the words with a unique irrefutable meaning for those involved in a communication process. They are the solid container where hollow words fit in.

4) Ambiguous words: are the words having two different excluding meanings. One of the meanings is functional to the communication process and the other is dysfunctional.

A communication process needs fulfill the following steps:

  1. Ritual
  2. Management of the implicit conflict
  3. Stimulation of the activity
  4. Pastime action

Peter Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute was the pioneer in using the unicist logical approach in complexity science research and became a private global decentralized leading research organization in the field of human adaptive systems. It has an academic arm and a business arm.
http://www.unicist.org/repo/#Unicist

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