Unicist Functionalist Approach

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Unicist Functionalist Approach

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Decision Rule Building in Business


The building of decision rules is the core of business organization in the 4th industrial revolution. It provides the basic information to build adaptive automation in business processes and to design business cobots to work as collaborative systems.

The decision rules are based on the use of unicist logic, which provides the rules of fundamentals-based AI that can be integrated with data-based AI to ensure the functionality of adaptive processes.

The building of decision rules is based on the fact that there is nothing in the universe, which is part of a system, that does not work with a purpose, an active function, and an energy conservation function. This triadic structure defines the concepts and functionality of things.

These rules implicitly provide the knowledge of the triadic structure of business functions and processes to build the necessary binary actions and business objects that allows managing their adaptability. 

Types of Decision Rules

Four basic types of decision rules have been found plus a dysfunctional type which is frequently used.  

Unicist Decision Rules

Dysfunctional Rules:

The dysfunctional rules are analogical rules, which will be described in the first place to be able to recognize them.

Analogical rules are those that are established based on analogical benchmarks that disregard the context of the functionality of things and are therefore not predictable in their results.

They are naturally used by those who have a tunnel vision of the business processes. When dysfunctional rules are used and things do not work, the context is usually blamed for this.

Functional Rules:

  1. Operational decision rules
  2. Analytical decision rules
  3. Systemic decision rules
  4. Adaptive decision rules

Operational Decision Rules

The operational decision rules define the operation of processes and are valid when the processes are not adaptive. They are based on the accuracy of the actions that need to be done and are functional to establish operational steps that need to be fulfilled to achieve an objective.

They are based on empirical decisions and the management of univocal actions that can generate predefined results.

Analytical Decision Rules

Analytical decision rules are based on the division of problems into their parts to make them manageable. They are functional in non-adaptive complicated environments. They are based on a theory-practice and top-down approach to generate decisions. They allow managing the knowledge that is necessary to make decisions.

Analytical decision rules are functional to avoid operational mistakes in complicated operational environments.

Systemic Decision Rules

They manage decisions based on the integration of the elements of a system considering them in terms of univocal cause-effect relationships, although assuming that their functionality is interdependent. They are based on a conscious experience-based approach to decision making.

Systemic decision rules are functional to make decisions in fields where the external influence of the environment is low.

Adaptive Decision Rules

Adaptive decision rules are based on the use of the ontogenetic maps of business functions and the use of the unicist logic to define the functionality of processes and the possibility of achieving results. They are based on managing a strong influence of the external environments by managing the rules to integrate the text, the restricted context, and the wide context as a unified field. 

They are based on a bottom-up – top-down approach to define the rules that must guide decisions. They use a conceptual and fundamentals-based approach to decision making.

Conclusion

The building of decision rules provides the basic information to build adaptive automation in business processes and to design business cobots to work as collaborative systems. The functionalist approach to rule building is based on using the rules that are implicit in the ontogenetic maps of the processes involved. The action of these rules is triggered by indicators and/or predictors to manage the operational consequences of the functionality of processes. Learn more

Diego Belohlavek

NOTE: The Unicist Research Institute (TURI) is a world leader in its segment. Since 1976, it has been specialized in complexity sciences applied to the research on the roots of evolution and its application to social, institutional, business and individual evolution.

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